R. Kienitz, M.A. Cox, K. Dougherty, R.C. Saunders, J.T. Schmiedt, D.A. Leopold, A. Maier, M.C. Schmid, Theta but not gamma oscillations in area V4 depend on input from primary visual cortex, Current Biology, 2020

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README.md

Data_from_Kienitz_et_al_Current_Biology_2020

Data from: R. Kienitz, M.A. Cox, K. Dougherty, R.C. Saunders, J.T. Schmiedt, D.A. Leopold, A. Maier, M.C. Schmid, Theta but not gamma oscillations in area V4 depend on input from primary visual cortex, Current Biology, 2020

Abstract: Theta (3-9 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) oscillations have been observed at different levels along the hierarchy of cortical areas and across a wide set of cognitive tasks. In the visual system, the emergence of both rhythms in primary visual cortex (V1) and mid-level cortical areas V4 have been linked with variations in perceptual reaction times [1–5]. Based on analytical methods to infer causality in neural activation patterns, it was concluded that gamma and theta oscillations might both reflect feedforward sensory processing from V1 to V4 [6–10]. Here we report on experiments in macaque monkeys in which we experimentally assessed the presence of both oscillations in the neural activity recorded from multi-electrode arrays in V1 and V4 before and after a permanent V1-lesion. With intact cortex theta and gamma oscillations could be reliably elicited in V1 and V4 when monkeys viewed a visual contour illusion and showed phase-to- amplitude coupling. Laminar analysis in V1 revealed that both theta and gamma oscillations occurred primarily in the supragranular layers, the cortical output compartment of V1. However, there was a clear dissociation between the two rhythms in V4 that became apparent when the major feedforward input to V4 was removed by lesioning V1: While V1 lesioning eliminated V4 theta, it had little effect on V4 gamma power except for delaying its emergence by >100 ms. These findings suggest that theta is more tightly associated with feedforward processing than gamma and pose limits on the proposed role of gamma as a feedforward mechanism.

Description: This data repository contains data in the MATLAB format from the above mentioned publication underlying the figures. Please always download the latest version of the files (via 'Browse Repository'). If any questions arise, please contact ricardo.kienitz@esi-frankfurt.de or michael.schmid@unifr.ch.

Files:

V1_MUA.mat - Raw powerspectra from V1 MUA channels from monkey K for the illusion and control condition. Refering to Figure 1.

V4_MUA.mat - Raw powerspectra from V4 MUA channels from monkey B and F before and after the V1 lesion for the illusion and control condition. Refering to Figure 1, Figure 4, Figure S1, Figure S2.

V4_LFP_TFR.mat - Raw V4 time-frequency representations from monkey B and F for low and high frequencies for the illusion and control condition before and after the lesion. Refering to Figure 1, Figure 4, Figure S1, Figure S2.

V1_CFC.mat - Modulation indices from V1 LFP channels from monkey K for the illusion and control condition. Refering to Figure 2.

V4_CFC.mat - Modulation indices from V4 LFP channels from monkey B and F for the illusion and control condition. Refering to Figure 2.

V1_laminar.mat - Raw normalized laminar distributions of MUA and LFP theta and gamma power from V1 channels from monkey Br. Refering to Figure 3.

V4_MUA_LFP_PrePost_Lesion.mat - MUA, dprime based on MUA, MUA theta, dprime based on MUA theta, LFP theta, LFP gamma, dprime based on LFP theta and LFP gamma from monkey B and F before and after the lesion. The dataset includes V4 channels with significant MUA, theta or gamma responses (MUA, MUA theta, LFP theta, LFP gamma) and V4 channels with a significant illusion-related modulation (dprime). Refering to Figure 4.

datacite.yml
Title Data from: Theta but not gamma oscillations in area V4 depend on input from primary visual cortex
Authors Kienitz,Ricardo;Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, Deutschordenstraße 46, 60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany; Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK; Epilepsy Center Frankfurt Rhine-Main, Center of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Goethe University, Schleusenweg 2-16, 60528 Frankfurt a.M., Germany
Cox,Michele A;Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 111 21st Avenue South, 301 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN 37240, USA; Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences - University of Rochester, Meliora Hall, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627
Dougherty,Kacie;Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 111 21st Avenue South, 301 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN 37240, USA; Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Washington Rd, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA
Saunders,Richard C;Laboratory of Neuropsychology, NIMH, Convent Drive 49, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Schmiedt,Joscha T;Ernst Strüngmann Institute (ESI) for Neuroscience in Cooperation with Max Planck Society, Deutschordenstraße 46, 60528 Frankfurt a. M., Germany
Leopold,David A;Laboratory of Neuropsychology, NIMH, Convent Drive 49, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA; Neurophysiology Imaging Facility, NIMH, NINDS & NEI, 49 Convent Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA
Maier,Alexander;Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, 111 21st Avenue South, 301 Wilson Hall, Nashville, TN 37240, USA
Schmid,Michael C;Institute of Neuroscience, Newcastle University, Framlington Place, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK; Faculty of Science and Medicine, Chemin du Musée 5, 1700 Fribourg, Switzerland
Description Theta (3-9 Hz) and gamma (30-100 Hz) oscillations have been observed at different levels along the hierarchy of cortical areas and across a wide set of cognitive tasks. In the visual system, the emergence of both rhythms in primary visual cortex (V1) and mid-level cortical areas V4 have been linked with variations in perceptual reaction times [1–5]. Based on analytical methods to infer causality in neural activation patterns, it was concluded that gamma and theta oscillations might both reflect feedforward sensory processing from V1 to V4 [6–10]. Here we report on experiments in macaque monkeys in which we experimentally assessed the presence of both oscillations in the neural activity recorded from multi-electrode arrays in V1 and V4 before and after a permanent V1-lesion. With intact cortex theta and gamma oscillations could be reliably elicited in V1 and V4 when monkeys viewed a visual contour illusion and showed phase-to-amplitude coupling. Laminar analysis in V1 revealed that both theta and gamma oscillations occurred primarily in the supragranular layers, the cortical output compartment of V1. However, there was a clear dissociation between the two rhythms in V4 that became apparent when the major feedforward input to V4 was removed by lesioning V1: While V1 lesioning eliminated V4 theta, it had little effect on V4 gamma power except for delaying its emergence by >100 ms. These findings suggest that theta is more tightly associated with feedforward processing than gamma and pose limits on the proposed role of gamma as a feedforward mechanism. - Please always download the latest version of the files (via "Browse Repository")
License CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/)
References
Funding National Institute of Mental Health Grant (ZIA-MH002838) to D.A.L.
National Eye Institute Training Grant (2T32 EY007135-21) to K.D.
Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship to A.M.
Research Grant by the Whitehall Foundation to A.M.
Career Starter Grant by the Knights Templar Eye Foundation to A.M.
Research Grant from the National Eye Institute (1R01EY027402-02) to A.M. and M.C.S.
Emmy Noether grant 2806/1 to M.C.S.
ERC grant OptoVision 637638 to M.C.S.
Keywords neuroscience
visual cortex
primary visual cortex (V1)
V4
oscillations
rhythms
theta
gamma
lesion
feedforward
feedback
Resource Type Dataset